Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation

By Jeffrey W. Alstete | Go to book overview

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Despite the continuing changes in higher education and an increasing number of alternatives to tenure today, tenured faculty are the largest cohort of faculty in colleges and universities. The U.S. Department of Education, in a national study of postsecondary faculty (National Center for Education Statistics, 1993), found that 92.8% of all institutional types award tenure and that 51.3% of all faculty were tenured or on a tenure track. The uncapping of the mandatory retirement age, the still widespread awarding of tenure, and the prolonged life span of the professoriat have all combined to increase the number of tenured faculty. This situation is of concern as a variety of external forces affect higher education, including increased use of information technology, globalization of the curriculum, decreasing government support, changing accreditation requirements, continued diversification in student demographics, and negative public perceptions about the tenure system. What will happen as these external influences affect changes in the institutional missions and how the outcomes from higher education are evaluated? The answer could be a negative confrontation as a result of the increasing age and knowledge gap, or a positive learning experience for both generations. Posttenure faculty development is one way to address this challenge.

What Is Faculty Development Today?

Several definitions of faculty development are found in the literature. [Faculty development] is a phrase that has both a broad and a narrow definition. Broadly, it covers a wide range of activities that have as their overall goal the improvement of student learning. More narrowly, the phrase is aimed at helping faculty members improve their competence as teachers and scholars (Eble and McKeachie, 1985). Faculty development programs vary in their purpose, but they are commonly designed to enhance personal and professional development, instructional development, and/or organizational development. Professional development involves promoting faculty growth and enabling faculty members to obtain and enhance job-related skills, knowledge, and awareness. Instructional development involves the preparation of learning materials, styles of instruction, and updating courses. Organizational development focuses on creating an effective institutional atmosphere in which

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Executive Summary iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Why Is Development of Tenured Faculty a Concern? 1
  • How Has Higher Education Responded to This Concern? 21
  • Posttenure Faculty Development in Action 45
  • Designing Development Programs for Tenured Faculty 65
  • Conclusion 87
  • Appendix A: Resources for Faculty Development 91
  • Appendix B: Nuprof Program at the University of Nebraska–lincoln 97
  • Appendix C: Sample Guidelines for a Faculty Development Plan 101
  • References 103
  • Index 115
  • Ashe-Eric Higher Education Reports 123
  • Advisory Board 125
  • Consulting Editors 127
  • Review Panel 129
  • Recent Titles 131
  • Back Issue/Subscription Order Form 134
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 126

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.