Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation

By Jeffrey W. Alstete | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

It is beyond cliché to discuss the increased calls for accountability in higher education over the last 15 years.

Assessment, performance indicators, changes in accreditation, performance funding, Total Quality Management, and many other processes call for higher education to provide evidence of performance. Performance measures are being redefined at more levels each year. And posttenure review of faculty members' performance is one way to hold higher education accountable to its constituents. Many individuals suggest that posttenure review undermines academic freedom and tenure. Others believe posttenure review can enhance faculty performance by ensuring more systematic and comprehensive feedback. And still others argue for posttenure faculty development. But faculty development is often noted as a cliché, meeting all the challenges presented to higher education, whether diversity, technology, or globalization. A palpable tension exists between interpreting posttenure review as a measure of accountability or development.

Looking more deeply at the tensions surrounding posttenure review, the AAUP in 1983 developed a statement suggesting that [periodic formal institutional evaluation of each postprobationary faculty member would bring scant benefit, would incur unacceptable costs, not only in money and time but also in dampening of creativity and of collegial relationships, and would threaten academic freedom.] AAUP also objects to posttenure review because the process often suggests that tenured faculty do not already undergo continual evaluation from student evaluations, reviews before appointment to school and university committees and graduate faculties, annual evaluations, performance plans, and so on. The AAUP cautions against the use of posttenure review because [at its most draconian, post-tenure review aims to reopen the question of tenure; at its most benign, it formalizes and systematizes longstanding practices] (AAUP, 1999).

There is more agreement that some posttenure review system, aimed at faculty development rather than accountability, is a needed strategy for improving performance. Jeffrey Alstete is aligned with the AAUP in his emphasis on development rather than accountability and the separation of evaluation and development. Instead of posttenure review, the author recommends posttenure faculty development to strengthen support for tenure. Alstete has many

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Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Executive Summary iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Why Is Development of Tenured Faculty a Concern? 1
  • How Has Higher Education Responded to This Concern? 21
  • Posttenure Faculty Development in Action 45
  • Designing Development Programs for Tenured Faculty 65
  • Conclusion 87
  • Appendix A: Resources for Faculty Development 91
  • Appendix B: Nuprof Program at the University of Nebraska–lincoln 97
  • Appendix C: Sample Guidelines for a Faculty Development Plan 101
  • References 103
  • Index 115
  • Ashe-Eric Higher Education Reports 123
  • Advisory Board 125
  • Consulting Editors 127
  • Review Panel 129
  • Recent Titles 131
  • Back Issue/Subscription Order Form 134
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