Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation

By Jeffrey W. Alstete | Go to book overview

DESIGNING DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
FOR TENURED FACULTY

At a time when some resources for higher education are becoming limited by states and the Federal Government and institutions are being pressured to produce more results, tenured faculty members are a valuable resource that needs to be developed and nurtured to help address these concerns. So far, this report has explored related literature on the need for posttenure faculty development and reviewed examples of how to develop and nurture tenured faculty at colleges and universities. But what organizational model should be adapted and what specific recommendations can be learned from the research and examples uncovered for establishing posttenure development programs and monitoring their effectiveness?

Overall, an institution's philosophy and mission should provide the framework for posttenure review and faculty development policy. Based on this mission-driven philosophy, the faculty development literature, and the examples discussed in this monograph, a general model of posttenure faculty development in higher education today is proposed in Figure 5. External changes affecting the internal environment of institutions that particularly influence faculty development programs include new instructional and information technology, student and faculty demographics, public perceptions about tenure, state legislation, and accreditation requirements. An analysis of the literature and examples in this report finds that development programs for tenured faculty can be classified as required, optional, or jointly sponsored. Effective posttenure faculty development should consist of separate optional and required elements, with instructional, personal, curricular, and organizational development components. These components are largely aimed at the outcomes of teaching, scholarship, service, and student learning. Faculty should be offered appropriate rewards for continuous, lifelong development and negative consequences for failure to grow and change with the needs of the students, the institution, and the society higher education serves. As with many processes in higher education, it is important that development of tenured faculty be guided by the mission and that the outcomes be evaluated for continuous evaluation and review. Methods of evaluation involve various assessment methods, benchmarking, feedback from alumni, external ratings by third parties, enrollment, self-evaluation, and other

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Posttenure Faculty Development: Building a System for Faculty Improvement and Appreciation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Executive Summary iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Why Is Development of Tenured Faculty a Concern? 1
  • How Has Higher Education Responded to This Concern? 21
  • Posttenure Faculty Development in Action 45
  • Designing Development Programs for Tenured Faculty 65
  • Conclusion 87
  • Appendix A: Resources for Faculty Development 91
  • Appendix B: Nuprof Program at the University of Nebraska–lincoln 97
  • Appendix C: Sample Guidelines for a Faculty Development Plan 101
  • References 103
  • Index 115
  • Ashe-Eric Higher Education Reports 123
  • Advisory Board 125
  • Consulting Editors 127
  • Review Panel 129
  • Recent Titles 131
  • Back Issue/Subscription Order Form 134
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