Contemporary Women's Writing in German: Changing the Subject

By Brigid Haines; Margaret Littler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Chapter 2 is a revised and extended version of Brigid Haines, 'Beyond Patriarchy: Marxism, Feminism, and Elfriede Jelinek's Die Liebhaberinnen', Modern Language Review, 92/3 (1997), 643–55. Chapter 5 is a reworking of Margaret Littler, 'Beyond Alienation: The City in the Novels of Herta Müller and Libuse Moníková', in Brigid Haines (ed.), Herta Müller (Cardiff: Cardiff University Press, 1998), 36–56, and Brigid Haines, '[The Unforgettable Forgotten]: The Traces of Trauma in Herta Müller's Reisende auf einem Bein', German Life and Letters, 55 (2002), 266–81.

All English translations of German quotations are our own and thus responsibility for any errors they may contain is ours. Where published English translations are known to exist they are listed in the Select Bibliography.

For their help in reading and commenting on sections of the book we should like to thank Adrian Armstrong, Çiğdem Balım, Stephanie Bird, Elizabeth Boa, Alexandra Clarke, Allyson Fiddler, Katharina Hall, Helen Hills, Beth Linklater, Lorraine Markotic, Lyn Marven, Hilary Owen, and John J. White. In addition Brigid Haines would like to acknowledge the support of the Arts and Humanities Research Board, whose award of a period of leave under the Research Leave Scheme greatly facilitated completion of the volume. Both authors are also grateful to the British Academy for funding the appointment of Sabine Rolle as Research Assistant, and to Sabine herself for her work on the bibliographical apparatus of the book.

BH
ML

-vi-

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Contemporary Women's Writing in German: Changing the Subject
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Ingeborg Bachmann, Simultan (1972) 19
  • 2: Elfriede Jelinek, Die Liebhaberinnen (1975) 39
  • 3: Anne Duden, 'übergang' (1982) 57
  • 4: Christa Wolf, Kassandra(1983) 78
  • 5: Herta Müller, Reisende Auf Einem Bein (1989) 99
  • 6: Emine Sevgi Özdamar, 'Mutter Zunge' and 'Großvater Zunge' (1990) 118
  • Chronology 139
  • Glossary 141
  • Further Reading 148
  • Select Bibliography 153
  • Index 155
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