Citizenship in Contemporary Europe

By Michael Lister; Emily Pia | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Migration in Europe

INTRODUCTION

Migration (and the associated issues of citizenship and belonging) is one of the most controversial issues in contemporary politics. As we shall see, it is frequently linked to questions of terrorism, crime and disorder and, if left unattended, seen as something that will prompt a general collapse in European society. In this chapter we will examine migration and citizenship in Europe and try to analyse why migration is so controversial, and what it means for both existing and potential citizens of Europe, and our conceptions of citizenship. It is frequently argued, as we have seen in previous chapters, that migration (and associated developments in human rights discourses) prompts a move away from a conception of citizenship focused upon the national. Yet, although there may be such theoretical moves amongst scholars, the passion and the fury that migration generates in political debates suggests that the national continues to play an important role in contemporary citizenship politics.

We will begin the chapter by examining levels and trends in migration and asylum for European countries, before going on to consider in detail, how three European countries (the Netherlands, Germany and Italy) have responded to contemporary patterns of migration. Amongst the specifics of each country, we will see here that the EU has come to hold a prominent position in the politics of migration. In the fourth section of this chapter, we will argue that EU policy here has come to be dominated by a securitised understanding of migration, which we will examine in greater detail, before concluding by considering how migration impacts upon our understandings and conceptions of citizenship.


MIGRATION LEVELS AND TRENDS IN EUROPE

There is a widespread assumption that migration in Europe is increasing.

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Citizenship in Contemporary Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • Tables and Figures vi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Theories of Citizenship 8
  • Chapter 2 - Theories of Citizenship: Feminism and Multiculturalism 32
  • Chapter 3 - Postnational Citizenship 58
  • Chapter 4 - Political Participation 80
  • Chapter 5 - The Welfare State 107
  • Chapter 6 - Migration in Europe 136
  • Chapter 7 - European Citizenship and European Identity 162
  • Conclusion 190
  • References 197
  • Index 217
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