Coretta Scott King Award Books: Using Great Literature with Children and Young Adults

By Claire Gatrell Stephens | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Minty: A Story of Young Harriet Tubman
Alan SchroederIllustrated by Jerry Pinkney1997 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award
About the Story
Minty is a fictionalized biography of Harriet Tubman's childhood. She was a slave on the Brodas Plantation on the eastern shore of Maryland. As a child, she was called Minty, which was short for her given name of Araminta. Known as a difficult slave, Minty was often punished for her spirited ways. Alan Schroeder and Jerry Pinkney have collaborated to provide an interesting story that allows the reader to learn about this brave woman while also discovering what life was like for slaves living on plantations in the Old South.
Objectives
After reading Minty: A Story of Young Harriet Tubman, the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the story's plot and characters.
2. Define the term [genre] and name at least three different types of literary genres.
3. Demonstrate analytical thinking by deducing information about the story from its illustrations.

Notes to the Teacher

This story allows you to introduce several new concepts to your students, while opening the doors of history for student inspection. Jerry Pinkney's award-winning illustrations also provide the opportunity for students to practice deduction and analytical thought. As historical fiction, this book is an excellent springboard for introducing literary genres to the class. It also provides you with an opportunity to introduce the real-life character of Harriet Tubman to your students.

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