U.S. History through Children's Literature: From the Colonial Period to World War II

By Wanda J. Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I'd like to thank my husband and children for their support throughout the writing of this book. It couldn't have been done without their patience and help.

Cheryl Gravelle from the Williamson Public Library was a whiz at locating materials.

Colleagues from Williamson Middle and Elementary Schools were full of ideas, literature recommendations, and much encouragement!

Without encouragement from John Robbins and Noreen Mascle, I may never have started writing in the first place.

Finally, I'd like to thank my late parents, Arnold Jacob Jansen and Marjorie Lookup Jansen, for their encouragement to always do my best and keep trying.

The following permissions were obtained to reprint materials that appear in this book.

The Certificate of Arrival Document for Aamout Jansen, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The Declaration of Intention Document for Aarnout Jacobus Jansen, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The Literature Response Guide (see fig. 10.1), is reprinted with permission from Leslie Wood, Williamson Elementary School, Williamson, NY.

The Medical Release from Military Duty Document for Franklin S. Dean, from the town of Marion in Wayne County, New York, dated August 12, 1864, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The Oath of Allegiance Document for Arnold Jacob Jansen, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The Petition for Naturalization Document for Aarnout Jansen, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The poem [Pioneers] is from Patriotic Plays and Programs by Aileen Fisher and Olive Rabe. Copyright (c) 1956 by Plays, Inc., Boston, MA.

The recipes for Butter, Maple Syrup Candy, Cornmeal Spoonbread, Indian Pudding, Virginia Pound Cake, Corn Fritters, Baked Beans, Hardtack, and Appleade, and The Indian Diet and A Soldier's Daily Camp Ration, are used with permission from Cooking Up U.S. History: Recipes and Research to Share with Children by Suzanne I. Barchers and Patricia C. Marden. Copyright (c) 1991, Teacher Ideas Press, a division of Libraries Unlimited.

The Surgeon's Exemption from Military Duty form from Wayne County, New York, is reprinted with permission of the document's owner, Wanda J. Miller.

The poem [There Is Power in a Union,] attributed to Joe Hill (pp. 87–89), is reprinted with the permission of Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers from Hand in Hand: An American His- tory Through Poetry, collected by Lee Bennett Hopkins. Text copyright (c) 1994 Lee Bennett Hopkins.

The poem [A Visitor] by Sarah Smith Caldwell, is reprinted with permission from Wanda J. Miller, great-great-great niece of the author.

-ix-

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U.S. History through Children's Literature: From the Colonial Period to World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Native Americans 1
  • Chapter 2 - Exploration 25
  • Chapter 3 - The American Revolution and the Constitution 46
  • Chapter 4 - Slavery and the Civil War 71
  • Chapter 5 - Pioneer Life and Westward Expansion 102
  • Chapter 6 - Immigration 130
  • Chapter 7 - Industrial Revolution 151
  • Chapter 8 - World War I 170
  • Chapter 9 - World War II 185
  • Chapter 10 - Supplemental U.S. History Resources 208
  • Index 213
  • About the Author 229
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