Beliefs and Values in Science Education

By Michael Poole | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I should like to acknowlege my debt to a number of colleagues in the preparation of this book. I am grateful to Professor Roger Trigg, Head of the Philosophy Department in the University of Warwick, for reading and commenting on Chapters 1 and 2. My debt to his own writings will be evident. I should also like to thank John Brooke, Professor of History of Science in the University of Lancaster, for reading and commenting on drafts of Chapters 3, 6 and 7. Again I should like to record the particular benefits I have received from his writings.

I have singled out these two colleagues for special mention, although my indebtedness to a vast number of other people will be evident from the extensive lists of references. Chapter 6 is developed from my article of the same title which appeared in the School Science Review in September 1990 and I am grateful to Andrew Bishop for his permission to do this. My appreciation goes to Dr John Martin, Reader in Physics at King's College London, for his comments on Chapter 5. My thanks also go to John Bausor, formerly Staff Inspector for Science with the Inner London Education Authority, for reading and commenting on the whole manuscript. Needless to say, the errors that remain are my full responsibility!

It is quite a long time ago that Brian Woolnough first slipped half a sheet of exercise paper (I still have it!) across the table during a meeting, asking, 'Would you be interested in writing a book … ?' My thanks go to Brian for his encouragement and valuable suggestions as the book has developed. So, too, my thanks go to John Skelton, Managing Director of the Open University Press, to Shona Mullen and Sue Hadden and to Pat Lee, Editorial Assistant, whose cheerfulness and helpfulness have been a constant inspiration.


Copyright acknowledgements

Verse extract on p. 20 is from Edel, A. (1955) Ethical Judgement: The Use of Science in Ethics, p. 16, Glencoe, IL, The Free Press. Copyright © 1955 by The Free Press; copyright renewed 1983 by Abraham Edel. Reprinted with permission of the publisher.

Extract on p. 5 is from 'Indoctrination', in The Durham Report, p. 358, London, National Society/SPCK. Reprinted with permission of Professor Basil Mitchell.


Photographic acknowledgements

To Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge for Figures 2.2 and 3.7; to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for Figures 4.4, 5.1 and 5.5; to Dr G.B.R. Feilden CBE FEng FRS for Figure 5.3; to Royal College of Physicians for Figure 6.7; to The Royal College of Surgeons of England for Figure 7.1 and Lady Lyell and the former Department of Geology, King's College London for Figure 7.4.

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