Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

By Sally Brown; Angela Glasner | Go to book overview

Part 2
Exploring the Effectiveness
of Innovative Assessment

Earlier chapters have argued for changes to assessment. In this part, the chapters address explicitly the question of innovation, and provide practical advice about how to begin to approach it.

Phil Race in Chapter 5 urges us to ask for whom assessment takes place, what its purpose is and what the various stakeholders in higher education want and need. Answering these questions takes him to a position where he advocates innovation despite the risks associated with it. He concludes that because traditional methods are not fulfilling their purposes – they fail to measure the knowledge, skills and attributes which we mean them to – we have no choice but to look to new ways of assessing. Our choices will involve us in making decisions about the timing and content of assessment, and about the balance between collaborative and individual work and that between assessing content and performance. In each of these decisions, Phil Race helps by providing us with prompting questions.

Liz McDowell and Kay Sambell (Chapter 6) in drawing our attention to the student perspective suggest that we do not yet know enough about the use of innovative methods in practice. We do not know whether they fulfill successfully the aspirations that, in them, teaching, learning and assessment are integrated into a meaningful unity. Their chapter makes it clear that innovative assessment is not necessarily beneficial to students and may not be entirely welcomed by them, although their research indicates that there may be considerable advantages over what students see as combative approaches in traditional assessment. To realize the potential of innovative assessment, we need to involve students and to share with them the intentions and implementation of new methods and approaches. They suggest that there are seven steps which can guide the teacher in implementing new assessment approaches more effectively, and that it is worth the effort – not least for students!

Finally, in Neil Fleming's chapter (Chapter 7), we are cautioned against an uncritical adoption of innovation. Like any other form of assessment, innovative assessment carries risks with it, and indeed may be more open to

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.