Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

By Sally Brown; Angela Glasner | Go to book overview

7
Biases in Marking Students'
Written Work: Quality?

Neil D. Fleming


Introduction

We build a huge edifice based on the grades and marks given by teachers in higher education, yet there is serious doubt about the validity and the reliability of those marks. Recently, higher education has had a great deal of rhetoric, discussion and energy about the measurement of quality. While there have been a number of initiatives in the 1990s that have focused on the meaning of 'quality' and how it might be enhanced, audited or assessed, the business of marking student scripts still remains as the most significant quality event in the lives of the students and the academics. It is at this early stage that the system has to have integrity. If not, then everything that is built on that fragile base of a set of marks will collapse. If we as academics cannot hold our heads up and say that in the process of marking student scripts we have been thoroughly professional, then the statements made by deans, provosts, and vice chancellors about quality are in error. Clark (1993), in a study about blind marking, states that,

Given that students are subject to the assessment process, it is a funda-
mental requirement that the assessment process be reliable and valid,
and perhaps above all else, equitable. Notwithstanding these laudable
ideals, educators should be aware that the assessment process is not as
scientific as it may sound. In fact, the assessment process is subject to
error and bias.

This chapter identifies the sources of bias in the marking of students' scripts. It examines some of the research literature and it suggests ways of lessening the effects of the bias where those exist. Where this is not possible, biases are better acknowledged than hidden and academic staff should have opportunities to discuss the biases that will not 'go away'. The word 'marking' is used throughout this paper synonymously with the word 'grading'.

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.