(Not) Keeping Up with Our Parents: The Decline of the Professional Middle Class

By Nan Mooney | Go to book overview

5
TO HAVE OR TO HOLD

Money, Marriage, and Children

Like many educated professional middle-class couples, Tessa and Richard decided to wait until their careers and finances had stabilized before having children. They met in graduate school, still harboring dreams of becoming a professor and a poet, and lived together five years before getting married. Tessa got her master's degree in history, then tested jobs in the nonprofit and legal fields before choosing, just over a year ago, to become a high school history teacher. Richard transitioned from the art world to Web design and now works as a Web manager for a nonprofit. They were married four years, both in their mid-thirties, when Tessa got pregnant. When she and I spoke on the phone one mid-July morning, their daughter's birth was just two months away.

“I always wanted to have kids,” Tessa tells me. “And we thought a lot about when would be the right time. Eventually we realized things would never feel right. There's never going to be enough money saved up or a good time to take a career break. You just have to jump in and hope you can figure out a way.”

Integrating career, family, and finances proved tricky from the start. While pregnant, Tessa took part in a rigorous yearlong training program designed for adults interested in making a career switch to teaching. She spent her days working in a public school an hour's commute from their house in South Boston and her evenings in class at a local college. A $500-a-month stipend replaced the $40,000 she'd been making working for a women's nonprofit organization; the couple essentially lived off Richard's $70,000 salary.

“Financially, it was a scary time to be cutting back,” Tessa admits,

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
(Not) Keeping Up with Our Parents: The Decline of the Professional Middle Class
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.