The Supreme Court of the United States: A Student Companion

By John J. Patrick | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
VISITING THE
SUPREME COURT BUILDING

The public may visit the Supreme Court Building at 1 First Street, N.E., Wash- ington, D.C., 20543, every week of the year, Monday through Friday, from 9:00 A.M. until 4:30 P.M. except on legal holidays. More than 700,000 people an- nually visit the Supreme Court Building. Visitors have access only to certain parts of the ground floor and first floor of the Supreme Court Building. The floor plans on this page show the areas open to visitors. Only the rooms with labels in the diagrams are accessible; all others are closed to visitors.

Visitors can see a film about the Court in a room on the ground floor. Staff members of the curator's office also give lectures about the Court and its history. Courtroom lectures are pre- sented daily, every hour on the half hour, from 9:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M., when the Court is not in session.

The courtroom includes seats for about 300 visitors, which are available on a first come, first seated basis. De- mand is usually high. The Court is in session to hear oral arguments in the Court chamber (courtroom) from 10:00 A.M. to noon and from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, for two-week periods each month, be- ginning on the first Monday in October until the end of April of each year. A session may also be held on Monday of the third week of the month. From mid- May through June, the courtroom ses- sions convene at 10:00 A.M. The Court uses these sessions to deliver its opinions on cases heard previously.

The exhibit hall on the ground floor contains portraits and statues of the jus- tices and other displays of documents and memorabilia relating to the work of the Court. The curator prepares two ex- hibits a year using the Court's collec- tions of photographs, prints, films, manuscripts, and other memorabilia. The curator's office also collects decora- tive and fine arts.

The kiosk of the Supreme Court Historical Society, on the ground floor next to the exhibit hall, sells books and other materials that provide visitors with additional information about the Supreme Court Building and the opera- tions of the Court.

This floor plan in-
dicates the parts of
the Supreme Court
Building open to
the public.

-383-

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The Supreme Court of the United States: A Student Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface to the Second Edition 7
  • Preface to the First Edition 8
  • How to Use This Book 9
  • The Supreme Court of the United States - A Student Companion 11
  • Appendix 1 - Terms of the Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court 379
  • Appendix 2 - Visiting the Supreme Court Building 383
  • Appendix 3 - Web Sites 384
  • Further Reading 386
  • Index 390
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