The Supreme Court of the United States: A Student Companion

By John J. Patrick | Go to book overview

FURTHER READING

Many entries in this volume include references to books dealing with that specific subject. The following volumes are more general in scope. They pro- vide useful ideas and information for your further study of the Supreme Court and its role in the constitutional history of the United States.

Abraham, Henry J. The Judicial Process. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Abraham, Henry J., and Barbara Perry. Freedom and the Court: Civil Rights and Liberties in the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Amar, Akhil Reed. The Bill of Rights: Creation and Reconstruction. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1998.

Anastaplo, George. The Constitution of 1787: A Commentary. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989.

Arbetman, Lee, and Richard L. Roe. Great Trials in American History. St. Paul, Minn.: West, 1985.

Bailyn, Bernard, ed. The Debate on the Constitution: Federalist and Antifederalist Speeches, Articles, and Letters During the Struggle Over Ratification. 2 vols. New York: Library of America, 1993.

Barnes, Patricia G. Desk Reference on American Courts. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 2000.

Baum, Laurence. The Supreme Court. 7th ed. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 2001.

Bernstein, Richard B., and Jerome Agel. Amending America: If We Love the Constitution So Much, Why Do We Keep Trying to Change It? New York: Random House, 1993.

Biskupic, Joan, and Elder Witt. Guide to the U.S. Supreme Court. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997.

———. The Supreme Court and Individual Rights. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997.

———. The Supreme Court and the Powers of the American Government. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997.

———. The Supreme Court at Work. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997.

Bowen, Catherine Drinker. Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention. 1966. Reprint. Boston: Little, Brown, 1987.

Burt, Robert A. The Constitution in Conflict. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992.

Carp, Robert A., and Ronald Stidham. Judicial Process in America. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1996.

Collier, Christopher, and James Lincoln Collier. Decision in Philadelphia: The Constitutional Convention of 1787. New York: Random House, 1986.

Cooper, Phillip J. Battles on the Bench: Conflict Inside the Supreme Court. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1999.

Cox, Archibald. The Court and the Constitution. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987.

Currie, David P. The Constitution in the Supreme Court: The First Hundred Years. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985.

———. The Constitution in the Supreme Court: The Second Century. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.

———. The Constitution of the United States: A Primer for the People. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Cushman, Clare, ed. The Supreme Court Justices. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1995.

Epstein, Lee, and Thomas G. Walker. Constitutional Law for a Changing Amer- ica. 4th ed. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 2001.

Epstein, Lee, et al. The Supreme Court Compendium: Data, Decisions, and Developments. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997.

-386-

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The Supreme Court of the United States: A Student Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface to the Second Edition 7
  • Preface to the First Edition 8
  • How to Use This Book 9
  • The Supreme Court of the United States - A Student Companion 11
  • Appendix 1 - Terms of the Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court 379
  • Appendix 2 - Visiting the Supreme Court Building 383
  • Appendix 3 - Web Sites 384
  • Further Reading 386
  • Index 390
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