3
An Islamic Pope

Secretary of State John Foster Dulles would recall a great sense of frustration during his 1953 trip to Saudi Arabia. His aides had somehow forgotten to schedule time for a dip in the Persian Gulf. An avid swimmer, Dulles collected swimming hole memories as others accumulated stamps. His aides had been so preoccupied with finding him a comfortable bed—a difficult task in the rough oil town of Dhahran, which he visited after a stop in Riyadh—that they had overlooked this readily accessible luxury. The newly appointed secretary of state was deeply disappointed to be so tantalizingly close to Saudi Arabia's exotic desert shores, yet unable to experience the Persian Gulf's refreshing waters. His disappointment would be minor compared to his later efforts to turn Saudi Arabia and King Abdel Aziz's son Saud into a proAmerican globally recognized Muslim leader.

The Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations would all experience considerable frustration trying to build a sustainable Middle East policy as anticolonialism and anti-Zionism swept across the region. During this period America cast about for allies in a region that seemed to be steadily drifting toward the Soviet camp. Although no administration initially sought Saudi Arabia's support, each ended up cultivating it. Saudi Arabia, for its part, explored different international alternatives. It preferred to work closely with Egypt, the Arab powerhouse, but turned to the United States when that proved unworkable. By the end of President Johnson's tenure the shifting alliances of the 1950s and 1960s had given way to a steadier U.S.-Saudi bilateral relationship, one that revolved around oil and anti-Communism.

In the election of 1952 Americans had put their faith in President Dwight D. Eisenhower, hoping that the retired general would lead the

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thicker Than Oil
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For John v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Thicker Than Oil xiii
  • Prologue 1
  • 1- Oil, God, and Real Estate 14
  • 2- Dropping Anchors in the Middle East 36
  • 3- An Islamic Pope 61
  • 4- Shifting Sands 78
  • 5- Double, Double, Oil and Trouble 106
  • 6- "A New and Glorious Chapter" 124
  • 7- Mobilizing Religion 140
  • 8- Begin or Reagan 152
  • 9- "We Support Some, They Support Some" 168
  • 10- The Cold War Ends with a Bang 191
  • 11- Parting Ways 204
  • 12- September 11 and beyond 232
  • 13- Reconfiguring the U.S.-Saudi Strategic Partnership 248
  • Notes 263
  • Select Bibliography 311
  • Index 333
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 353

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.