Successful School Improvement: The Implementation Perspective and Beyond

By Michael G. Fullan | Go to book overview

Critical Introduction

MICHAEL HUBERMAN


Opening remarks: on the pleasure of writing critical
introductions

Putting aside the time and labour required, it is usually a pleasure to write an introduction to a book. First of all, one normally writes them for books one likes, and for authors whose work one respects. The authors themselves, of course, are generally careful to make sure this is the case before asking, but you never know. With fellow specialists on school improvement as friends, sometimes you don't need enemies. This is especially the case with 'critical introductions' - like this one.

It is also a pleasure to write introductions because it allows the commentator to sift through a fellow specialist's work and to highlight as 'essential'the very themes he agrees with the most or on which his own work has centred. The reader will soon find me doing precisely this, when arguing that this book tells us several new things about the change process since the field was last reviewed comprehensively.

Finally, writing an introduction to this book will enable me to raise some questions which, in my opinion, are answered here in other ways than the ways I would have addressed them. Some of them are questions with which I will be taking issue with the author. But most are ones which no one has resolved completely when actually coming to grips with the implementation of significant instructional changes in schools, be it change on a one-shot or on a continuous basis. The pleasure here is less that of giving the impression that one knows more or better than the author - unless the critic actually believes this than of being able to pinpoint some interesting points without the burden of having to work them through. Introductions, after all, are just that, and the reader is impatient to get to the substance of the book itself.

With this list of pleasurable tasks, I have mapped the terrain for the remainder of this text. First, I shall try to put Michael Fullan's work in perspective and, from that vantage point, assess his contribution to our understanding

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Successful School Improvement: The Implementation Perspective and Beyond
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 130

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.