Global Strategy: Creating and Sustaining Advantage across Borders

By Andrew Inkpen; Kannan Ramaswamy | Go to book overview

Strategy and Globalization: A Final Note

Continued globalization is inevitable. While there surely will be some bumps along the road, further integration among people, countries, governments, cultures, and organizations is going to happen, and just about every industry is going to be impacted. Some industries will see the change in more substantial ways than others, but overall no industry will remain untouched. As we discussed in chapter 1, globalizing industries bring together far-flung buyers and sellers in a network of local, regional, and global players. From the sushi industry to the diamond industry, new players are shaking up incumbent firms and expanding the presence of already well-established industries. One of the authors of this book recently purchased a diamond ring for his daughter. The ring was purchased in Singapore from a Singapore-owned retail chain that has a significant localcost advantage in the moderately priced diamond jewelry market. The ring was manufactured in China in a factory owned by the retailer. The diamond was from South Africa and was cut in Belgium. The Singapore retailer claimed that it was able to undercut its local jewelry competitors through its economies of scale in low-cost manufacturing and bulk diamond purchasing. Not long ago, this type of approach with diamonds would have been difficult because of a fragmented and secretive diamond industry. But as the diamond industry globalizes, it takes on characteristics similar to those of other industries, such as firms searching for low-cost manufacturing and fierce competition across industry value-chain activities.

New competitors will emerge that will challenge the incumbents of today, and these competitors may come from some unlikely sources. Until a few years ago in the home furnishings industry, conventional wisdom was that the cost of shipping and the fragmented nature of the industry meant that manufacturing and retailing close to the customer would remain the norm. Instead, the furniture

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Global Strategy: Creating and Sustaining Advantage across Borders
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Strategic Management Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1: Globalization and Global Strategy 10
  • 2: Strategic Choices in a Global Marketplace 32
  • 3: Global Strategy and Organization 54
  • 4: International Strategic Alliances 80
  • 5: Global Knowledge Management 107
  • 6: Leveraging Knowledge Resources Globally 130
  • 7: Global Strategy in Emerging Markets 152
  • 8: Corporate Governance Issues in International Business 180
  • 9: Ethics and Global Strategy 204
  • Strategy and Globalization: A Final Note 223
  • Notes 227
  • Additional Reading 239
  • Index 243
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