Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview

§3 Esther Hewlett Copley
(1786–1851)

Esther Copley was born in London, the youngest daughter of a wealthy silk manufacturer, Peter (Pierre) Beuzeville and his wife, Mary (Marie) Meredith, both of French Huguenot descent. In April 1809, she married James Hewlett, an Anglican curate in Oxford. They had three sons and two daughters. She married William Copley, a Baptist minister in Oxford in 1827, after the death of her first husband. Esther Copley had previously become a member of the Baptist church. William later became an alcoholic while a minister in Eythorne, Kent. During this time Copley wrote his sermons for him and saw that the congregation ran well despite her husband's handicap. He left both his wife and the church at Eythorne in 1843. She stayed in the village until her death in 1851. Two of her sons became priests in the Anglican Church, but she remained a Baptist.

Copley was a prolific author. Her household management manual, Cottage Comforts, published in 1825, was very popular, reaching its twenty-fourth edition by 1864. It was filled with practical advice for the working classes. Copley wrote A History of Slavery and its Abolition (1836) for children, from the viewpoint that slavery is a result of human sinfulness; this work is presently considered her most significant. Her other books for youth included Scripture Natural History for Youth (1828), Scripture History for Youth (1829), and Scripture Biography (1836).10 The money she earned from writing supported her family. In a letter to her husband William, written around 1829, she listed what she had earned from her publications, and wrote that she hoped these earnings would "contribute to your comfort and that of our dear children."11

10 Source: Rosemary Mitchell, "Copley, Esther," in The Oxford Dictionary of National
Biography
13:343–44.

11 See Hewlett-Beuzeville-Roussel, "Writings: Esther Hewlett/Copley," http://www.wit-
ness.com.au/esther%20writings.htm (accessed May 5, 2005).

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 495

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.