Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview

§34 Sarah Trimmer
(1741–1810)

Sarah Trimmer was an Anglican author and educator.2 Trimmer was a middleclass wife and mother, married to the owner of a brick works, and the daughter of a member of the royal court at Kew. She lived within walking distance of the palace at Kew, and some of her books are dedicated to members of the royal family3 or other members of the upper class. She had a very conservative view of society and class. This is seen especially in her Essay on Christian Education in a section regarding dress. She clearly states that attention must be paid to the way one dresses to maintain the distinction between classes. She claimed that St. Paul's injunction to women not to have braided hair or dress excessively (1 Tim. 2:9) was not made to upper-class women. Trimmer's views on class are a part of the social lens through which she read scripture and influenced the applications she drew from the story of Hagar.

The following excerpt on Hagar is from Trimmer's one-volume commentary on the Bible, A Help to the Unlearned (1805), which was written as an aid to Bible reading for those who could not afford more expensive study aids. Trimmer assumed the book would be used next to the scriptures. In her introduction, she told her readers how to use the book: first, they should check in the commentary to see how many verses are explained in one paragraph, next read the verses from the Bible, then read her explanation.

In her comments on Genesis 16 and 21, Trimmer anticipated and answered the questions readers of her day might have asked when reading the Bible. Many of these questions are similar to those twenty-first century readers ask, but Trimmer did not always answer them in the way that we might expect. She carefully pointed her readers to lessons for Christian living from the account of Hagar.

From Sarah Trimmer, A Help to the Unlearned in the Study of the Holy
Scriptures: Being an attempt to explain the Bible in a familiar way
(London:
F. C. & J. Rivington, 1805), 20–21, 24–25.


Chapter XVI

We may suppose that Abram, Sarai, and Hagar, having all lived in an idolatrous country, and having no holy scriptures to guide them, acted contrary

2 See part 2: "Sarah—The First Mother of Israel" for more information on Sarah Trimmer.

3 For example, The Economy of Charity is dedicated to Queen Charlotte.

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 495

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.