The Psychology of Stereotyping

By David J. Schneider | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
Summary

Social scientists have been obsessed with stereotypes for well over half a century. Have we learned anything in those 70-plus years? Yes, we have. Quite a bit, actually, and it is probably fair to say that modern conceptions of stereotypes would hardly be recognized by early investigators in this area. I conclude this lengthy book with a brief discussion of what has changed, in part because it is always good to document progress in the social sciences, but also because so many people, including some social scientists, have not fully grasped the "new look" in stereotypes.


STEREOTYPES ARE NOT ROGUE GENERALIZATIONS

In the early days, there was essentially universal agreement that stereotypes were rotten generalizations that smelled up the mental household. They were inaccurate, largely produced by prejudiced minds or shoveled into ignorant minds by prejudiced culture. They were negative, rigidly held, and impervious to disconfirming evidence. Unfortunately, most of this is wrong. Some stereotypes are like that, but most are not, not usually, not inevitably.

The first assumption was that stereotypes were inaccurate generalizations, maintained through ignorance, prejudice, and cultural realities. Today few social psychologists would endorse this as a general description, racist stereotypes notwithstanding. We now recognize that stereotypes cannot easily be divorced from more "normal" ways of thinking about people. As a cognitive process, stereotyping seems pretty much like business as usual. Stereotypes are simply generalizations about groups of people, and as such they are similar to generalizations about dogs, computers, Anne Rice novels, city buses, or Beethoven piano sonatas. We have them because they are useful. I use stereotypes about students when I prepare my lectures (and, for that matter, stereotypes about prospective readers of this book while I write it); my physician uses them when he categorizes me as a guy with sinus problems; movie producers use them when they decide how to cast movies; politicians eagerly embrace

-564-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Stereotyping
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 708

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.