Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice

By Thomas F. Cash; Thomas Pruzinsky | Go to book overview

54
Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches
to Changing Body Image

THOMAS F. CASH
MELISSA D. STRACHAN


HISTORICAL AND CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

During the past 40 years, the cognitive or cognitive-behavioral paradigm emerged as a "fourth force" in psychotherapy, on the heels of psychoanalytic, strictly behavioristic, and humanistic approaches. Although cognitivebehavioral therapies (CBT) do not derive from a singular perspective, the shared tenets and values of CBT proponents often include (1) either a rational or a constructivist emphasis on individuals' learned views of their environment, their life events, and themselves; (2) the related proposition that cognition mediates behavior and behavioral change as well as emotion and emotional change; (3) a belief that cognitive contents and processes can be accessed and altered; and (4) a valuing of psychological science for understanding, preventing, and treating problems in living.

The scientific allegiance of CBT has afforded it a central position among empirically supported treatments of psychological disorders. CBT's proponents believe that, through carefully executed clinical trials, effective treatment based on specifiable interventions is demonstrable. Such data encourage application of CBT to different problems and different populations. In this manner, CBT has evolved as a treatment of choice for many disorders, including body image dysfunctions. To appreciate the conceptual bases of CBT approaches to changing body image, see two chapters in Part I of this volume: Cash presents a detailed cognitive-behavioral model, and Williamson and his colleagues discuss a cognitive information-processing perspective.

-478-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.