Applied Exercise Psychology: A Practitioner's Guide to Improving Client Health and Fitness

By Mark H. Anshel | Go to book overview
Contents
Prefaceix
Foreword by Murphy M. Thomas, PhDxv
1.What Is Applied Exercise Psychology?1
2.Exercise Barriers: Why We Do Not Enjoy Physical Activity11
3.Theories and Models of Exercise Behavior23
4.Mental Health Benefits of Exercise37
5.Strategies For Promoting Exercise Motivation53
6.Basic Applied Exercise Physiology for Consultants67
7.Exercise Prescription Strategies83
8.Exercise Adherence and Compliance99
9.Consulting With Special Populations113
10.A Proposed Values-Based Model for Promoting Exercise Behavior131
11.Cognitive and Behavioral Strategies to Promote Exercise Performance147
12.Maintaining Quality Control: Personal Trainers, Fitness Facilities, and Proper Programs171
13.Future Directions in Exercise Consulting179
Appendix A: Exerciser Checklist187
Appendix B: Exercise Tests191
Appendix C: Examples of Correct Stretches207
Recommended Books, Journals, and Website Resources225
List of Organizations and Publications227
References231
Index237

-vii-

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