Healing Crisis and Trauma with Body, Mind, and Spirit

By Barbara Rubin Wainrib | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Those of you who have been my colleagues and students (as well as all of you who will read this book) know of a concept I created called the “Phoenix Phenomenon,” which refers to the capacity for growth after crisis and about which you will read later in these pages. My initial publication of this concept was in 1972, and it continues to be valid, as you will see in chapter 6. This book, however, is, in itself, a “phoenix phenomenon.” Without the support of Dr. Ursula Springer and Sheri Sussman of Springer Publishing Company, it would never have existed. A new creation arose from the ashes of a very painful situation, and I am deeply grateful to both of them for their responsiveness and their support.

Were it not for an important conversation with a special (unnameable!) friend, I may never have had that “Aha! “ moment that showed me the direction I needed. (And I would not have gotten to that conversation were it not for his mother—so, yes, sometimes mothers do help!)

Although I have written and edited several books, this is the first time that I have totally flown solo. It definitely has both advantages and disadvantages, and I am very grateful to my family for their varied types of support. I am deeply indebted to my beloved daughter, Jeannine Wainrib, a multigifted young woman who moves gracefully from rearranging peoples' lives to editing and rearranging her mother's writings. And all of this is done in the midst of making a major life change herself, joining with Dr. Rod Merl, an equally caring and helpful soul.

For many years, we have been a family of dedicated Macintosh users, believers, and supporters. However, during this experience, I started to believe that Macintoshes were allergic to me. Not one but both of my otherwise trusty machines tested my faith and seemed to have rebelled against me. The final blow came when, dangerously close to my deadline, my “user-friendly” Mac moved itself into an otherwise unknown program (I think from Mars, but definitely not from Venus!). It refused to respond

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Healing Crisis and Trauma with Body, Mind, and Spirit
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.