The Freedmen's Bureau and Reconstruction: Reconsiderations

By Paul A. Cimbala; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

10
"A Full-Fledged Government of Men": Freedmen's Bureau Labor Policy in South Carolina, 1865–1868

James D. Schmidt

WHEN BREVET MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT KINGSTON SCOTT assessed his previous year's work as assistant commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau in South Carolina in early 1867, he used the standard of northern free labor. "That free labor is a success," Scott declared, "there can be no doubt in every instance where it has been tested by practical and fair minded men, who were willing to treat the black men as laborers are treated at the north and in other parts of the country." By invoking the benchmark of northern free labor, the assistant commissioner acted in accord with many other northerners, both in and out of the Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees and Abandoned Lands. As the work of Eric Foner and other historians has made clear, the Bureau operated primarily as an agent of free-labor ideology, trying to balance out the needs of planters and freedpeople with the assumptions of bourgeois society in the North. By the time of the Civil War, however, those assumptions had come to mean many things for many different groups of people. For some, free labor implied the ownership of productive property, either in the form of land or in the form of a small shop or other petty proprietorship. For others, it meant simple self-ownership, which implied freedom from the will of another and the ability to sell one's labor power freely in the marketplace. For still others, as historians of labor law have uncovered in recent years, free labor implied a set of legal relationships that regulated both the marketplace and the shop floor.1

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Freedmen's Bureau and Reconstruction: Reconsiderations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.