Modern Japan: A History in Documents

By James L. Huffman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe deep thanks for the skillful, gracious editorial team at Oxford University Press, which did so much to turn my feeble words into something more polished: Nancy Toff, Karen Fein, Un Choi, Beth Ammerman, and Martin Coleman (cheers for Tottenham Hotspur!). I also am indebted deeply to several assistants and former students who helped with translations and finding materials, especially to Dukoh Koh and Matt Steele, as well as Yuko Morizono in Kumamoto, Japan. Keiko Higuchi at the International House Library in Tokyo was, as usual, exceptionally helpful—the kind of person who makes you feel that she wanted you to ask for assistance! My Wittenberg students in Japanese history also merit special thanks; their talent for encouragement and willingness to put up with my stories is extraordinary. And my children—James, Nao, Kristen, and Dave (as well as their children, Grace and Simon)—deserve more thanks than I'll ever be able to give them, for providing me lodging when I was searching out materials, for giving me advice, for giving me more of everything important than a father and grandfather ever deserved.


Picture Credits

Art Resource, New York: 26; Consulate General of Japan, New York–from 1997 Japan Photo Encyclopedia: 15, 186, 187, 188, 191, 193, 200, 202, 203, 205, 207, 208; Courtesy of James L. Huffman: 9, 67; Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center: 43; Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.: 30, 34, 40, 41; From History of the Empire of Japan, Tokyo 1893, courtesy Library of Congress: 18; From the Cortazzi collection at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures: 48–49; From The Russo-Japanese War: History and Postal History by Kenneth G. Clark: 95; Giraudon/Art Resource, NY: 20; HarpWeek: 33; Honolulu Academy of Arts: 19, 42; Hoover Institution Archives: 72, 144; Kanagawa Kenritsu Rekishi Hakubutsukan: 55; Kuwabara Shisei: 182; Library of Congress: 1, 10, 22, 45, 46, 50, 51, 56, 61, 65, 68, 69, 78, 79, 80, 82, 85, 90, 91, 94, 96, 99, 103, 106, 108, 111, 119, 121, 122, 123, 125, 132, 136, 147, 149, 152, 154, 155, 158, 161, 162, 163, 164, 168, 169, 171, 172, 173, 174, 177, 178, 183; Meiji Shimbun Zasshi Bunko: 94, 114, 120, 127, 140; Nagasaki Atom Bomb Museum: 157; Nagasaki Kenritsu Nagasaki Toshokan: 53; National Archives: 14, 15, 50, 52, 109, 130, 135, 143, 150, 151, 160, 166, 168, 170; 181; National Diet Library (Japan): 53; National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution/Art Resource, New York: 50; Nihon Kindai Bungakukan: 3, 16, 101; Nippon Foundation: 184; Ono Hideo, courtesy of the Ono Hideo Collections, Shakai Jōhō Kenkyūjo: 28, 85; Peabody Museum: 54; reprinted with permission from Japan Inc. Introduction to Japanese Economics, by Shotaro Ishinomori, translated by Betsey Scheiner. University of California Press: 1988: 196–197; Scala/Art Resource, New York: 58, 59; The Japan Times: 138; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Howard Mansfield Collection, Gift of Howard Mansfield, 1936: 38; The Newark Museum/Art Resource, New York: 53; Tokyo Kokuritsu Hakubutsakan: 54, 75; Toyota: 211; University of Saskatchewan Archives, H.E. GRUEN FONDS, MG 116, Series IV. Postcards: 77; Werner Forman/ Art Resouce, New York: 16, 24, 31; Yokohama Kaiko Shiryokan: 50

-219-

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Modern Japan: A History in Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter One - The Shogun's Realm 17
  • Chapter Two: Picture Essay - The Old Order Topples: 1853–68 47
  • Chapter Three - Confronting the Modern World: 1868–89 57
  • Chapter Four - Turning Outward: 1890–1912 81
  • Chapter Five - Imperial Democracy: 1912–30 107
  • Chapter Six - The Dark Era:1930–45 131
  • Chapter Seven - The Reemergence: 1945–70 159
  • Chapter Eight - Japan as a World Power: After 1970 185
  • Timeline 212
  • Further Reading and Websites 214
  • Text Credits 216
  • Acknowledgments 219
  • Index 220
  • About the Author 224
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