Union Soldiers and the Northern Home Front: Wartime Experiences, Postwar Adjustments

By Paul A. Cimbala; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

WE WOULD LIKE to thank the librarians at Fordham University, the New York Public Library, Saint Joseph's University, the Civil War Library and Museum, Haverford College, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Library Company of Philadelphia, and the University of Pennsylvania for their assistance in preparing this volume. Thanks also to the Saint Joseph's University Faculty Development Fund for supporting the preparation of this collection. We are especially grateful to Carol Digel, the historian of the Darley Society, for tracking down a copy of Felix O. C. Darley's News From the Front, which we've used for our cover illustration. Ms. Digel put us in touch with Ray Hester, who with his wife Judith founded the Darley Society and is its present executive director. Mr. and Mrs. Hester, owners of the Darley Manor Inn, Darley's former home in Claymont, Delaware, are also owners of the Darley print. They graciously provided a copy of the illustration for our use, hoping that its presence on our cover will prompt more people to seek out Darley's wonderful art and book illustrations.

The contributors to this volume made our editorial work that much easier by providing us with well-written, well-researched essays. We thank them for their cooperation and their patience.

Megan McClintock, one of our contributors, passed away before this book's publication. She was an extraordinary scholar who will be missed by the profession. The editors thank her father, Thomas C. McClintock, Professor Emeritus of History at Oregon State University, for providing additional information required for completing this volume.

Once again, Fordham University Press provided us with the encouragement and support required for completing this volume. Saverio Procario, Mary Beatrice Schulte, Anthony Chiffolo, Jacky Philpotts, and Loomis Mayer eased our burdens. Finally, the editors wish to thank Linda Patterson Miller and Elizabeth C. Vozzola for living with another one of these projects for much too long a time.

-ix-

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Union Soldiers and the Northern Home Front: Wartime Experiences, Postwar Adjustments
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The North''s Civil War Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1- Filling the Ranks 1
  • 1- "We Are All in This War" 3
  • 2- "Volunteer While You May" 30
  • 3- "If They Would Know What I Know It Would Be Pretty Hard to Raise One Company in York" 69
  • 2- Northerners and Their Men in Arms 117
  • 4- "Tell Me What the Sensations Are" 119
  • 5- "Listen Ladies One and All" 143
  • 6- Soldiering on the Home Front 182
  • 7- Saving Jack 219
  • 8- In the Lord''s Army 263
  • 9- Carrying the Home Front to War 293
  • 3- From War to Peace 325
  • 10- "Surely They Remember Me" 327
  • 11- "Honorable Scars" 361
  • 12- The Impact of the Civil War on Nineteenth-Century Marriages 395
  • 13- A Different Civil War 417
  • 14- "I Would Rather Shake Hands with the Blackest Nigger in the Land" 442
  • 15- "For Every Man Who Wore the Blue" 463
  • Afterword 483
  • Contributors 489
  • Index 493
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