Abraham Lincoln, a Press Portrait: His Life and Times from the Original Newspaper Documents of the Union, the Confederacy, and Europe

By Herbert Mitgang | Go to book overview

Sources and Publications

The original sources of this material are derived from newspaper morgues, public and private libraries, historical societies, and university collections from Maine to California. In Castine, Maine, for example, I spoke to friends and examined the papers of Noah Brooks, who was Lincoln's favorite Washington correspondent (and has the final article in this book). Many librarians in towns small and large cooperated cheerfully; they are our overlooked scholars.

The Illinois State Historical Library and the New York Public Library's various departments and rooms were major sources. The new interpretations here are mine, of course. They are based in part on three visits I made to the Illinois prairie country, going over lands Lincoln surveyed, sitting in old courthouses where he practiced, studying original sites where he debated. James T. Hickey, curator of the Lincoln collection at the State Historical Library, and Max Goodsill of Knox College, Galesburg, guided me in these areas. James N. Adams, in charge of the library's newspaper room, made possible parts of the early chapters of this book because of his meticulous indexing of the Springfield press. The late state historian Harry E. Pratt, Marion D. Pratt, and Margaret A. Flint all helped. A study of the bulletins from the present state historian, Clyde Walton, was enlightening.

The New York Public Library's newspaper annex, now in the West Forties near the Hudson River, was an indispensable source of original and microfilmed material. It was then located in mid-Manhattan's sewingmachine district, of all places. But Lincoln is where you find him. The newspaper annex is a curious place frequented by seedy historians and scholarly horse-players who show up before the daily double to study the back numbers of racing's Morning Telegraph. Perhaps the historianhorse-player combination is not so curious at that. There is a kinship between them: both chart past performances in order to handicap the present.

Scores of other libraries contributed hints, leads, and publications—

-xix-

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Abraham Lincoln, a Press Portrait: His Life and Times from the Original Newspaper Documents of the Union, the Confederacy, and Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The North's Civil War Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction to the 2000 Editior ix
  • Sources and Publications xix
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Young Lincoln 3
  • Chapter 2 - Congressman Lincoln 49
  • Chapter 3 - The Great Debater 77
  • Chapter 4 - A National Man 129
  • Chapter 5 - Lincoln for President 163
  • Chapter 6 - President at War 235
  • Chapter 7 - The Emancipator 305
  • Chapter 8 - Commander-In-Chief 351
  • Chapter 9 - The Second Term 415
  • Chapter 10 - As They Saw Him 477
  • Index 525
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