Abraham Lincoln, a Press Portrait: His Life and Times from the Original Newspaper Documents of the Union, the Confederacy, and Europe

By Herbert Mitgang | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
The Emancipator

APRIL 1862-JANUARY 1863

When Lincoln was twenty-eight years of age and a Representative in the Illinois General Assembly, resolutions were passed by the strongly pro-Southern legislators saying that "the light of property in slaves, is sacred to the slave-holding states by the Federal Constitution, and that they cannot be deprived of that right without their consent." Only two legislators dissented—"Dan Stone and A. Lincoln, Representatives from the county of Sangamon." They said: ""We" believe that the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy; but that the promulgation of abolition doctrines tends rather to increase than to abate its evils." Thus Lincoln, in 1837, speaking out qualifiedly against slavery.

During his first Inaugural he repeated a statement made during the great debates with Senator Douglas: "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so." The main goal then was the Union and the Constitution, and it remained so as the Civil War unfolded. Lincoln could draw a distinction between his personal feelings against slavery and his public actions, which he construed as moderate under the Constitution.

But now events moved toward emancipation. Abolitionist opinion hammered at the White House. European opinion was a factor, and it surely could not find disfavor with freedom. From a military viewpoint, the slaves could be a source of manpower. Southern publications ran columns of advertisements offering rewards for the return of runaway

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln, a Press Portrait: His Life and Times from the Original Newspaper Documents of the Union, the Confederacy, and Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The North's Civil War Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction to the 2000 Editior ix
  • Sources and Publications xix
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Young Lincoln 3
  • Chapter 2 - Congressman Lincoln 49
  • Chapter 3 - The Great Debater 77
  • Chapter 4 - A National Man 129
  • Chapter 5 - Lincoln for President 163
  • Chapter 6 - President at War 235
  • Chapter 7 - The Emancipator 305
  • Chapter 8 - Commander-In-Chief 351
  • Chapter 9 - The Second Term 415
  • Chapter 10 - As They Saw Him 477
  • Index 525
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 536

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.