The Trespass of the Sign: Deconstruction, Theology, and Philosophy

By Kevin Hart | Go to book overview

3
Metaphysics and theology

1 'Ground' and critique

All critiques exercise reason and question grounds, but only some seek to interrogate the ground of reason itself. At a certain level of generality the enterprise of offering a critique of reason is circular, since the very distinctions which permit the operation of critique are themselves conditioned by reason. Upon closer inspection, however, it becomes clear that the circle need not be vicious and that such a critique can be lodged. One needs, first of all, to distinguish between offering specific reasons to justify a particular position, as all philosophers do, and construing reason as a ground, such as in the Leibnizian principle of sufficient reason. And second, one needs to demonstrate that reason, thus defined, is blind to its condition of possibility. The question arises, though, just how far the critique is to be taken. For in specifying the condition of reason's possibility one also begins a process of supplying another ground, such as the will or being; and while this new ground may differ importantly from reason, its function as ground will remain unchallenged. We must ask, then, whether the object of a critique of reason is 'reason' or the more fundamental and redoubtable notion of 'ground' itself. Modern philosophy offers examples of both kinds of critique, and matters are complicated by the fact that the critique of ground often develops by way of a critique of reason. Such is the case with Nietzsche, and the concerns of this chapter may be brought into focus by a brief comparison and contrast between this mode of critique and the other mode, exemplified by Kant, which questions reason though not 'ground' as such.

It is this critique of ground, unbroached by Kant, which interested Nietzsche and which, in his last writings, he sought to affirm: in part by extending the bounds of the Kantian problem-

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Trespass of the Sign: Deconstruction, Theology, and Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction to the 2000 Edition ix
  • Preface xxxiii
  • I - Confrontation 1
  • 1: Interpretation, Signs and God 3
  • 2: Deconstruction Otherwise 40
  • 3: Metaphysics and Theology 71
  • II - Examination 105
  • 4: The Status of Deconstruction 107
  • 5: Questions of Scope 138
  • III - Dialogue 171
  • 6: The Economy of Mysticism 173
  • 7: Kant: Mysticism and Parerga 207
  • 8: Heidegger 237
  • Appendix to: The 2000 Edition 271
  • The God Effect 273
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index of People 313
  • Index of Topics 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.