Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England

By Dennis Taylor; David Beauregard | Go to book overview

7
Shakespeare's Fairy Dance with
Religio-Political Controversy in
The Merry Wives of Windsor

by Regina M. Buccola

Roosevelt University, Chicago, Illinois

Fairies "much affect the papacie."

Robert Herrick, "The Fairie Temple," from The Complete

Poetry of Robert Herrick

DESPITE SEVERAL RECENT ATTEMPTS to begin redressing the disparity,1 fairy tradition has lost out in the critical conversation about early modern drama to the ideologies of Christianity and classical Greece and Rome. However, the fairy tradition is every bit as significant to our critical attempts to situate early modern plays in their historical contexts as the struggles associated with state-mandated religious beliefs, and the delineation of classical literary influences are widely agreed to be. Fairy beliefs were much more than rural superstitions in sixteenthand seventeenth-century Britain. When fairies appeared in popular plays and were invoked in public debates in London and its environs, their airy bodies were made to resonate with a political and religious import that extended far beyond folklore.

Fairies were imaginative responses to the stresses of life in a rapidly changing world. The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Britain witnessed significant social changes, including religious reforms with immense socio-political implications, and a widening gap between urban, mercantile culture and rural, agrarian life. The powers and characteristics popularly attributed to fairies serve as a measure of early modern socio-cultural anxieties in the face of these changes.2 Early

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.