Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England

By Dennis Taylor; David Beauregard | Go to book overview

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

CLARE ASQUITH graduated MA with a congratulatory First in English from St. Anne's College, Oxford, in 1973. She has since worked in publishing and education and has lived and traveled widely with her family in Eastern Europe, where her husband was a diplomat. More recently, she has published articles on Shakespeare's poem "The Phoenix and the Turtle" in The Shakespeare Newsletter (Spring 2000) and TLS (April 13, 2000). She is currently preparing a book on Shakespeare and the Reformation, to be published by Scribners.

DAVID BEAUREGARD, O.M.V., is Dean of Studies at Our Lady of Grace Seminary, Boston. He is the author of Virtue's Own Feature: Shakespeare and the Virtue Ethics Tradition (1995), a study of Shakespeare's plays as representations of Aristotelian-Thomistic virtues and vices. He is currently working on a volume on Shakespeare's Catholic theology as it is manifested in several of the plays.

REGINA M. BUCCOLA is Assistant Professor of English at Roosevelt University. Her primary research interests are early modern British drama and twentieth-century British and American feminist drama. She has presented papers on these topics at the annual meetings of the Modern Language Association, the Renaissance Society of America, and the Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies, among others. Her publications include essays on American playwrights Megan Terry and Cherríe Moraga in Tortilleras: Hispanic and Latina Lesbian Expression and Fake City Syndrome, respectively, and poetry in Aries, New Growth Arts Review, Reflections: A Poetry Quarterly, and Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum.

RICHARD DUTTON is Professor of English at Ohio University State. He has published widely on early modern drama, especially on questions relating to censorship: his latest book on that theme is Licensing, Censorship and Authorship in Early Modern England: Buggeswords

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