Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the "War on Terror"

By Andrew Martin; Patrice Petro | Go to book overview

PICTURING TORTURE
GULF WARS PAST AND PRESENT

TONY GRAJEDA

A series of public events unfolded in April 2004 that pointed to the significance of image culture in what had become a media war over the war in Iraq. The first involved news coverage of the siege of Fallujah, where fierce fighting had claimed the lives of at least a dozen U.S. marines and, by many accounts, more than six hundred Iraqi civilians, including women and children. As reported by Knight Ridder Newspapers on 11 April military spokesperson Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt addressed the growing crisis during a regular news briefing in Iraq. An Iraqi journalist asked the senior U.S. military officer about televised images broadcast on Arabic-language newscasts, in particular that of grisly footage showing dead Iraqi civilians. Kimmitt responded: “My solution is change the channel.”1

Later in the month, photographs of flag-draped coffins of U.S. soldiers, loaded onto a cargo plane from Iraq to be transported to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, were published by the Seattle Times and posted on the Memory Hole Web site. The cargo workers who had taken the photos were swiftly fired by their employer, Department of Defense contractor Maytag Aircraft Corporation, reportedly for violating the Pentagon's strict ban on images of dead soldiers.2 By the end of April, two more media events would add fuel to the fire in the battle over images in this “war on terror.” First, the ABC News show Nightline aired a special program, “The Fallen,” in which anchor Ted Koppel read a solemn roll call of the more than seven hundred U.S. service people killed in Iraq to date. The Sinclair Broadcast Group, which owns sixtytwo U.S. television stations in thirty-nine markets, ordered its ABC affiliates to preempt the broadcast, issuing a statement that the program “appears to

-206-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the "War on Terror"
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.