Creating an Inclusive School

By Richard A. Villa; Jacqueline S. Thousand | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Access to the
General Education Curriculum for All:
The Universal Design Process

Alice Udvari-Solner, Richard A. Villa, and Jacqueline S. Thousand

Let's examine three students—Shamari, Ivan, and Christina—in Ms. Chavez's 11th grade history class.

Shamari seems to succeed effortlessly in academic and extracurricular venues: he's captain of the baseball team, a tennis player, and first trumpet in the high school band. Passionate about environmental issues, Shamari volunteers his opinions with confidence in public settings. He is opinionated about school politics and was elected to represent his peers at the school board. Shamari exhausted high school math and is taking advanced math at the university in the evening. Statistics, data analysis, technology applications, and Internet research are his strong skills. He recently helped establish a state-of-the-art Web site for the school. Shamari has shown ability in teaching others but does not like working in groups because he believes it is [communism in disguise.]

Ivan arrived from Chechnya, where his family was killed in the Chechen civil war. Catholic charities assisted him in coming to the United States to live with his uncle, who is also a newcomer to this country and who recently lost his job. Ivan and his uncle are temporarily residing in a homeless shelter. Ivan still has limited English proficiency. However, he is motivated to communicate and seeks out other students with his approachable smile, curious disposition, and cooperative manner. Ivan draws pictures to communicate his ideas when words fail. He often carries a prized, out-of-date, 35mm camera plus pictures of his life in Chechnya as a social bridge to

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