Multiple Intelligences and Student Achievement: Success Stories from Six Schools

By Linda Campbell; Bruce Campbell | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Interest in Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences and its application to education has been substantial since the publication of Frames of Mind in 1983 and Gardner's keynote address in early 1984, for a standingroom-only crowd at the Education Explosion Conference in Tarrytown, New York. More than a decade later, the attention focused on multiple intelligences (MI) remains unabated. Teachers, schools, and districts have embraced this model of intelligence as their guide amid much recent educational turmoil.

To date, however, the literature on MI theory in K-12 schools has been limited to how-to pedagogical applications or pilot classroom or school programs. Multiple Intelligences and Student Achievement: Success Stories from Six Schools is the first book to examine educational programs that have used MI for five or more years. It begins to answer questions that all educational innovations must ultimately address, such as, [How have MI programs affected student achievement?] and [Where and how were those results achieved?]

In search of answers to these questions, we contacted six public schools that claimed to have implemented MI programs for five or more years. The six schools—two elementary, two middle-level, and two high schools— serve a variety of student populations across the United States. Although each school's program is distinct, the programs resemble one another in two significant ways: MI provides a philosophic and curricular framework in each site, and the students have made significant academic achievement gains as measured by respected standardized tests, state assessment tests, and anecdotal comments from informed educators.

In writing the book, we wanted to understand the context and the processes of these MI-related successes. Chapter 1, [Why MI?], explores why a variety of teachers, grade levels, and disciplines have adopted Gardner's

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Multiple Intelligences and Student Achievement: Success Stories from Six Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Introduction vi
  • 1: Why Mi? 1
  • 2: Elementary Schools, Mi, and Student Achievement 12
  • 3: Middle-Level Schools, Mi, and Student Achievement 40
  • 4: High Schools, Mi, and Student Achievement 63
  • 5: Lessons Learned from Mi School Programs 90
  • References 98
  • Contact Information and Visitation Policies for the Six Mi Schools 100
  • Index 102
  • About the Authors 109
  • Related Ascd Resources: Multiple Intelligences 110
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