Moving to Markets in Environmental Regulation: Lessons from Twenty Years of Experience

By Jody Freeman; Charles D. Kolstad | Go to book overview

Index
abatement, modeling level of, 150
abatement costs, 22, 124, 133
auctioned permits and, 30
counterfactual estimates, 210–212
economic incentives and, 131
estimates, 210–21 2
flow rate and, 162
role in market-based regulation, 34
abatement technology/techniques. See technology
absolute efficiency, of liability, 254–255
accidental spills, 258, 265
liability, 260–263, 269
accumulation limits, 75
acid rain, 23, 34, 198
in Europe, 99
Acid Rain Program, 48, 97, 147, 194, 198, 333. See also sulfur dioxide allowance trading program
costs of, 135–136
environmental performance of, 50–52
estimating abatement under, 204
implementation and enforcement, 52
inflexibility of, 134
innovation in, 454
Ackerman, Bruce, 448
Activities Implemented Jointly, 78
adaptability
hypotheses about, 114
of types of regulation, 133–135
administrative burden, 5, 78
of economic incentives versus prescriptive regulation, 125–127
of leaded gasoline phasedown, 187–190
administrative costs, 76
analysis, 68–69
of municipal solid waste disposal, 310
of variable rate pricing policies, 298, 310
advance disposal charges, 280, 281
affluence, link to environmental protection, 355
Agenda for Action, 288
agriculture. See also Conservation Reserve Program
land preservation, 10
use of incentive-based regulation, 230–231
air pollution, 67–68, 439
interactive effects, 181–182
interstate, 411–412
noncommercial sources, 388

-471-

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