Just Don't Get Sick: Access to Health Care in the Aftermath of Welfare Reform

By Karen Seccombe; Kim A. Hoffman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A project of this magnitude involves the assistance of many people, and we are appreciative of all our colleagues who gave considerable time and effort to this project. Co-investigators included Heather Hartley, Jason Newsom, and Clyde Pope, who were integral to all aspects of data collection and analysis. We worked closely together for over three years so that we could better understand what happens to the health of families and their access to health care after they leave welfare for work. Their contributions are woven together here in this book.

We also express our appreciation to the many students associated with the School of Community Health and the Center for Public Health Studies who contributed countless hours helping us conduct quantitative and qualitative interviews, transcribing and coding data, tracking respondents in the far corners of Oregon, analyzing the mounds of data that we collected, and assisting in drafting the final report for our funding organization. These students include Christina Albo, Gwen Marchand, Cathy Gordon, Tosha Zaback, Richard Lockwood, Valerie Nias, and Terri Brockel. Karen McNeil, Donna Harris, Beth Bull, and Wayne McFetridge provided important staff support at our university, and Marcus Vincent generously donated many hours to help us with programming and other technical tasks. As usual, Richard Meenan provided the always appreciated editing assistance and help with organizing the tables and references.

We also thank the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for its funding of this project, and Pamela Owens, our project officer at AHRQ. Without their vote of confidence a study of this magnitude would have been impossible. We also want to acknowledge the key staff at Adult and Family Services (AFS) and the Office of Medical Assistance Programs (OMAP) for providing us with access to their administrative data that allowed our ideas to come to fruition.

Most of all, we extend our warmest appreciation and thanks to all the women and men who generously gave of their time to participate in this study. We are honored to represent your voices and hope that others will listen closely to them. You have much to add to discussions about meaningful welfare reform.

-ix-

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Just Don't Get Sick: Access to Health Care in the Aftermath of Welfare Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1: Introduction Access to Health Care and Welfare Reform 1
  • Chapter 2: Health Status and Health Changes 28
  • Chapter 3: Insurance Coverage 63
  • Chapter 4: Other Access and Barriers to Health Care 90
  • Chapter 5: Do Families Get the Health Care They Need? 114
  • Chapter 6: Worry, Planning, and Coping 136
  • Chapter 7: Facing Reality 163
  • Appendix 185
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 205
  • About the Author 213
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