Just Don't Get Sick: Access to Health Care in the Aftermath of Welfare Reform

By Karen Seccombe; Kim A. Hoffman | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Do Families Get the Health Care They Need?

One advantage of a study that takes place over time is the kind of trust and rapport that can be built between a respondent and an interviewer. Maya is an example of someone who initially seemed a bit reserved toward us, but over the course of a year of contact, made a distinct effort to allow us into her life. Her background gives her a unique perspective in that her employer works in public policy, and she is his assistant. In addition to the story she shared about her own experiences, she was able to offer insights into what is problematic with the OHP/Medicaid system.

When we first met her, Maya lived in subsidized housing in a neighborhood that had seen a significant amount of gentrification over the past several years. As we walked up to the well-kept brick building in which her apartment was located, the smells and sounds of various dinners being prepared floated through the air. Maya greeted us through her screen door with her low, rich voice. Luminous blue eyes offset her hard-set jaw. Immediately bounding to the screen door that separated us was Maya's beautiful five-year-old daughter, Andrea, who was anxious to discover who [mommy] was talking to.

Although she was very courteous, it was clear that Maya intended to keep us at arm's length. She did not invite us in, but instead directed us to sit on the front porch. The warm weather had driven many of the building's inhabitants outdoors, and we watched several children playing together in the parking lot below her steps. Andrea stayed inside to play, but Maya slung her bouncy nine-month-old son, Terry, on her hip and brought him outside to sit with us.

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Just Don't Get Sick: Access to Health Care in the Aftermath of Welfare Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1: Introduction Access to Health Care and Welfare Reform 1
  • Chapter 2: Health Status and Health Changes 28
  • Chapter 3: Insurance Coverage 63
  • Chapter 4: Other Access and Barriers to Health Care 90
  • Chapter 5: Do Families Get the Health Care They Need? 114
  • Chapter 6: Worry, Planning, and Coping 136
  • Chapter 7: Facing Reality 163
  • Appendix 185
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 205
  • About the Author 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.