Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music

By Angela Myles Beeching | Go to book overview

3
Building Your Image: Creating Promotional Materials That Work

Promotional materials are necessary tools for musicians. These materials are used in building a performer's reputation and for booking performances, attracting audiences, selling CDs, and more. The purpose of promotional materials is to tell the story of who you are and what your music is about. What story you tell and how you tell it matters.

Promotional materials include bios, publicity photos, CDs, and other specialty items to fit the situation such as letters of recommendation, reviews, listings of performances and repertoire, sample programs, and so on. CDs and websites, also promotional tools, are covered in later chapters. Like your career itself, your promotional materials are ever in a state of change. As your career develops, as you gain experience, you will add to and edit your materials. But you do need to start with good quality, usable materials.

Musicians use “promo” materials for a variety of purposes, in seeking bookings and press coverage for performances, and in contacting artist managers, conductors, record labels, as well as in applying for teaching jobs, competitions and grants. Promotional materials are typically sent in a packet referred to as a promo kit (and when sent to the press, as press kits).

The good news is that creating your own promo materials is not rocket science. It takes time and effort but you don't have to be a graphic designer, a publicity expert or spend a fortune to end up with excellent professionalquality materials. Musicians sometimes ask, “Can't I just pay someone to do all this for me?” And my answer is, when you learn how to create and use promo materials you are in the driver's seat with your career. You want to make informed decisions about the story being told about you and your music. Later on in your career, if you work with an artist manager, publicist, or record label, you will want to be an informed and savvy partner in all the

-36-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Prelude: Confessions of a Career Counselor 3
  • 1: Mapping Success in Music 9
  • 2: Making Connections 19
  • 3: Building Your Image 36
  • 4: Expanding Your Impact 68
  • 5: Online Promotion 111
  • Interlude: Fundamental Questions 132
  • 6: Booking Performances like a Pro 141
  • 7: Building Your Reputation, Growing Your Audience 166
  • 8: Connecting with Audiences 187
  • 9: Performing at Your Best 207
  • 10: The Freelance Lifestyle—managing Your Gigs, Time, and Money 234
  • 11: Raising Money for Music Projects 271
  • 12: Getting It Together 291
  • Appendix - More Resources, Please! 315
  • Index 329
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.