Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music

By Angela Myles Beeching | Go to book overview

8
Connecting with Audiences: Residency, Educational, and Community Programming

This chapter goes beyond individual performances in formal concert settings. Here we're focusing on residencies and residency work—what is also referred to as community engagement activities, educational programming, or outreach.


What Is Residency Work?

The term residency can be confusing. Traditionally, residencies referred to artist-in-residence opportunities, long-term teaching and performance positions for ensembles (occasionally for soloists) at colleges or universities. These positions are quite difficult to attain as they are generally offered only to wellestablished groups. It's nice work if you can get it, but these are not the only kinds of residencies available. There are also residency positions that aim to develop emerging ensembles; some of these lead to graduate degrees or diplomas, and offer coaching with distinguished faculty members.

In recent years, the definition of “residency” has been extended to include shorter-term engagements for teaching artists, sometimes with performance and teaching activities at multiple sites. The term residency is now used to describe anything from a touring musician's weeklong stay in a community, doing several children's programs at schools, to an ensemble's concert series at a museum, or an ongoing teaching and performing partnership with a university. These are all considered residencies, no matter what the duration, and whether or not the artists actually live in the community.

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Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Prelude: Confessions of a Career Counselor 3
  • 1: Mapping Success in Music 9
  • 2: Making Connections 19
  • 3: Building Your Image 36
  • 4: Expanding Your Impact 68
  • 5: Online Promotion 111
  • Interlude: Fundamental Questions 132
  • 6: Booking Performances like a Pro 141
  • 7: Building Your Reputation, Growing Your Audience 166
  • 8: Connecting with Audiences 187
  • 9: Performing at Your Best 207
  • 10: The Freelance Lifestyle—managing Your Gigs, Time, and Money 234
  • 11: Raising Money for Music Projects 271
  • 12: Getting It Together 291
  • Appendix - More Resources, Please! 315
  • Index 329
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