The Many Faces of Philosophy: Reflections from Plato to Arendt

By Amélie Oksenberg Rorty | Go to book overview

36
My Way to Phenomenology

MARTIN HEIDEGGER

Before going to the University of Freiburg to study mathematics and philosophy,
Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) attended a Jesuit seminary. At Freiburg, he worked
with Husserl, who introduced him to phenomenology. In his first major book,
Being and Time (1927), he followed Nietzsche and Kierkegaard in attempting to
revise—and reverse—the history of philosophy, returning it to (what he took to
be) its pre-Socratic mode. The question, "in what does the being of things that
exist consist?," was to take a new turn. Although there is hardly a work of
philosophy that is more abstract, more densely populated with technical ne-
ologisms, Heidegger undertook to return "fallen," logocentric man back to the
existential anxiety of the experience of finitude, his realization of his "nothing-
ness," his "being-towards-death." Lured by science and technology, modern man
has lost touch with the "everydayness" of existence, with "the Beingness of
being, the ground … the clearing … in which existence reveals itself." Although
every person is "thrown" into a specific time and condition, we define ourselves
by questioning the meaning of our own existence.

After the publication of Being and Time, Heidegger succeeded Husserl as
Professor at Freiburg in 1928. Increasingly, he found the "Volk Nationalism" of
Germany—which he saw as a return to peasant simplicity—consonant with his
critique of modern cosmopolitan society. Elected to the position of rector of
the university in 1933, he became a member of the Nazi party and was instru-
mental in stripping Husserl of his academic privileges. After a year in office, he
retired from the rectorship and returned to his position as professor, but he
remained a member of the party until 1945. Although he detached himself from
his Nazi allegiance, he apparently never apologized for his treatment of Husserl
and other Jewish university faculty.

Heidegger never finished the architectonic he set for himself in Sein und Zeit.
His later works—essays on Hölderlin, art, metaphysics, technology—explore the
ways in which language reveals—and obscures—"the ground and clearing of
Being." He was impressed by, and declared himself to have found philosophic
kinship with, Zen Buddhism.


On Being and Time

MY WAY TO PHENOMENOLOGY

My academic studies began in the winter of 1909–10 in theology at the University of Freiburg. But the chief work for the study in theology still left enough time for philosophy which belonged to the curriculum anyhow. Thus both volumes of Husserl's Logical Investigations lay on my desk in the theological seminary ever since my first semester there. These volumes belonged to the university library. The date due could be easily renewed again and again. The work was obviously of little interest to the students. But how did it get into this environment so foreign to it?

-423-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Many Faces of Philosophy: Reflections from Plato to Arendt
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.