Something Happened: A Political and Cultural Overview of the Seventies

By Edward D. Berkowitz | Go to book overview

notes

A NOTE ON THE NOTES

I have tried in the notes that accompany this book to keep the references to a bare minimum. That practice has meant that the notes are not bibliographic essays on the topics covered by the book, fragments of material cut from the main body of the text, or indications to potential reviewers that I have read their books. They simply list my direct debts to other works.

Readers who want to learn more may want to consult the books in the bibliography, chosen because they were helpful to me and accessible to a general audience. As the bibliography makes clear, there is an abundance of books about various aspects of the seventies.

Two other types of sources should be mentioned. The first is the Internet, which is teeming with information about the seventies. One can find convenient summaries of network-news programs; the biographies of people who have served in Congress; the text of Supreme Court decisions; the texts of Nixon's, Ford's, and Carter's presidential speeches; and much else besides on the Web. It seems to me that historians can no longer afford to ignore this valuable resource, and I have tried to include links to at least some of the major Web sites in the notes.

The second type of source that has proved valuable to me are the many movies and television programs that are on DVD. I have found the commentary on these DVDs to be particularly helpful.

Although the great bulk of the information used in this book comes from secondary sources, such as the ones listed in the notes and bibliography, I have inevitably fallen back on the knowledge I have gained from previous projects and on material from the National Archives, the presidential libraries of Ford and Carter

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