Something Happened: A Political and Cultural Overview of the Seventies

By Edward D. Berkowitz | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people helped me to write this book. Let me start with James Warren of Columbia University Press who commissioned this project and remained in touch as an advisor and sympathetic critic over the course of several years. I am grateful to him for his help and for his deep interest in the book.

Then there are the people who allowed me to test my ideas before academic audiences. Gareth Davies graciously invited me to England and took an active interest in the book. Anthony Badger introduced me to the delights of high table at Cambridge. Raymond Richards and Jan Pilditch facilitated my trip to New Zealand and showed me a wonderful time. Brendon O'Connor invited me to a conference in Brisbane; I thank him for his help and hospitality. I also gave a paper on the seventies at the History of Public Policy Conference. I am grateful to Meg Jacobs for arranging the session and to David Farber, Judith Stein, and Bruce Schulman for their participation and comments. David, in addition, was kind enough to send me an advanced copy of his edited book of essays on the seventies. Donald Critchlow, a longtime comrade in arms in the academic wars, organized this conference, talked with me about the seventies, and read preliminary drafts of this book. I appreciate his help on this project and on many others over the years. Closer to home, I want to thank Jennifer Brinkerhoff and Kathy Newcomer for letting me speak on the seventies at the Student Faculty Forum for Public Administration and Marcus Raskin for permitting me to drag the seventies into a seminar on the National Security State.

Nor do my debts end there. Julian Zelizer, whose career has inspired in me a faith that political history and policy history are viable fields, was kind enough to give me a draft copy of his book on congressional reform, which proved invaluable to me. Frances Kleeman generously shared materials related to the seventies

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