Observing Harry: Child Development and Learning 0-5

By Cath Arnold | Go to book overview

6 Harry develops
mathematical concepts
Mathematics, like language and literacy, is generative. In other words, when Harry learns to use numbers, to understand concepts about shape, space and measuring, he is developing concepts that he can apply to new situations.Piaget (2001: 163) tells us that thought is 'internalised action'. Harry initiates many actions that help him to understand his world and his particular culture. As we see in Chapter 3, Harry uses his whole body at first and then objects to begin to understand concepts. Just as he uses the stories told to him to understand his emotions, he uses the mathematical signs (like numbers), practices (like using the phone) and words (like 'on top', 'behind' and 'before') with which he is familiar to understand emergent mathematical ideas.Pound (1999) says that 'children's mathematical development, like so many other aspects of their learning, strongly reflects the culture within which they grow up' (p. 2). Schiller (in Bruce et al. 1995: 132) tells of a little girl who could work out 'pretend shopping' accurately in her head because of her real-life experience. She does it over and over again correctly, but then 'I had glanced down at the completed sums on the small blackboard on her desk; in every case the answer was wrong'. What she is learning in school does not make human sense to her and is not connected to the learning that she does, spontaneously and from necessity, at home.This chapter is divided into sections:
Harry explores capacity, size and fit
Learning to count
Investigating length, measurement and equivalence

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Observing Harry: Child Development and Learning 0-5
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 161

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.