A Handbook for Teacher Research: From Design to Implementation

By Colin Lankshear; Michele Michele | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book owes much to the support of friends, colleagues and organizations in dif- ferent parts of the world. We want to acknowledge their contributions here, while recognizing that they bear no responsibility for any of the book's limitations.

Our first thanks go to the Primary English Teaching Association (PETA) in Australia for encouraging us initially to think about writing for teacher researchers. In 1998 PETA invited us to write a short monograph for teachers interested in researching literacy. The Association published Ways of Knowing in 1999, and it was largely due to the positive reception the book received from diverse individuals and groups that we continued our inquiries further when we moved to Mexico in 1999.

Mexican educationists and researchers have been highly supportive of our attempts to write accessible and practically-oriented introductions to teacher research. The Michoacan Institute for Educational Sciences has published three of our texts in this area and encouraged us to think our ideas through within conference and workshop settings as well as on screen and paper. The National Pedagogical University in Morelia has recently published a greatly expanded version of the kind of text we produced for PETA. In these endeavours we are especially indebted to the roles played by Manuel Medina Carballo, Guadalupe Duarte Ramĺrez, Jorge Manuel Sierra Ayil, José H. Jesús Ávalos Carranza and Miguel de la Torre Gamboa.

During the period in which we have worked on this book we have been supported economically by a range of institutions and academic grantees while working primarily as freelance educational researchers and writers. We want to acknowledge the gen- erous support of Mexico's National Council for Science and Technology, the Centre for University Studies and the Postgraduate Seminar in Pedagogy at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mark Warschauer, Hank Becker and Rodolfo

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