Social Theory, Social Policy and Ageing

By Carroll L. Estes; Simon Biggs et al. | Go to book overview

7 Ageing and globalization

Key points:
Global challenges to the nation state and implications for policy on ageing.
The role of intergovernmental organizations in the new order of later life.
Transnational ageing, migration and ageing in developing countries.
Caring across borders, global care chains and institutional responses to old age.

Introduction

So far in this book, we have been exploring a range of theories and issues directly connected with debates and studies about the nature of growing old. This chapter widens the discussion with an exploration of how global social changes are transforming the experience of ageing. Globalization, defined here as the process whereby nation states are influenced (and sometimes undermined) by transnational actors (Beck 2000a), has become a major force in shaping responses to population ageing. Growing old has itself become relocated within a transnational context, with international organizations and cross-border migrations creating new conditions and environments for older people. Globalization, it will be argued, has produced a distinctive stage in the social history of ageing, with a growing tension between nation state-based solutions (and anxieties) about growing old and those formulated by global actors and institutions. Ageing can no longer be viewed as a 'national' problem or issue. Local or national interpretations of ageing made sense in a world where states were in control of their own destiny; where social policies were being designed with the aim or aspiration of levelling inequalities; and where citizenship was still largely a national affair (and where there was some degree

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Theory, Social Policy and Ageing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • 1: An Introduction to Social Theory, Social Policy and Ageing 1
  • 2: Social Theory and Ageing 8
  • 3: Age and Identity 25
  • 4: Feminist Perspectives and Old Age Policy 44
  • 5: Productive Ageing, Self-Surveillance and Social Policy 63
  • 6: Biomedicalization, Ethics and Ageing 79
  • 7: Ageing and Globalization 102
  • 8: The Politics of Ageing 122
  • 9: Conclusion 145
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.