Counselling Skills for Nurses, Midwives, and Health Visitors

By Dawn Freshwater | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
Caring for the carer

It is only relatively recently that certain constraints on the nurse– patient relationship have been relaxed. As late as the 1980s patients were viewed essentially as a biological body to be observed by the nurse, with practitioners being encouraged to maintain an emotional distance from their patients. Traditional approaches to organizing nursing, such as task allocation, were seen as advantageous in that they afforded the nurse some protection from anxiety. Splitting up the daily routine into tasks to be completed reduced the contact and involvement that practitioners had with patients (Menzies-Lyth 1970; Salvage 1995; Briant and Freshwater 1998). Menzies-Lyth (1970) argues that this also served the purpose of desexualizing the nurse–patient relationship, despite the necessity for physical intimacy. As described in Chapter 3 the work of Isobel Menzies-Lyth represented a turning point in understanding nurse–patient interaction. This chapter, building on concepts raised in earlier chapters, draws upon the work of Menzies-Lyth and other nursing theorists in order to address the notion of nursing intimacy. In examining the emotional labour of caring, I also aim to raise awareness of the impact of contemporary policy changes and professional developments on the nurse–patient relationship.

This chapter also attends to the question of what the practitioner does when they need to talk to someone, or when they experience the need for counselling themselves. Exploring the

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Counselling Skills for Nurses, Midwives, and Health Visitors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface x
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Process of Counseling 14
  • Chapter 3 - Beginning a Relationship 33
  • Chapter 4 - Sustaining the Relationship 49
  • Chapter 5 - Facilitating Change 62
  • Chapter 6 - Professional Considerations 76
  • Chapter 7 - Caring for the Carer 92
  • Appendix 107
  • References 112
  • Index 119
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 121

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.