Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

By Judith Bell; Clive Opie | Go to book overview

3.1
BACKGROUND TO
THE STUDY

This MEd study was carried out by Lim Cher Ping who at the time was teaching in a college in Singapore (Lim 1997). Like most other new researchers whose work we are considering in this book, he was registered for this part-time degree at a British university. He had a statistics and IT background and so had a head start over most of the researchers whose work we are discussing. He did not have to learn how to use a computer, which is what Helen had to do and was not in the least 'afraid of stats' as Gilbert claimed to be. He had no trouble dealing with computer statistical packages but he was, nevertheless, new to research. He had always tried to make a note of what went well with his teaching and what required some amendment, but he had reached the stage of wanting to adopt a more formal approach to research on his own practice, to experience the discipline of becoming a practitioner researcher and to be able to relate theory to practice. The importance of this topic became of even greater significance when the Singapore government's Masterplan for IT in Education was announced (the web page address of the plan is provided in the References at the end of the book: Masterplan for IT in Singapore (2001)). This was an investment of two billion Singapore dollars to make learning with computers a way of life in the classroom and involved the production of a six-year plan for

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Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures and Tables xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - The Descriptive Study 5
  • 1.1 - Background to the Study and Critics of Descriptive Studies 7
  • 1.2 - The Preparation 11
  • 1.3 - Moving on to Data Collection 15
  • 1.4 - Using Computer Statistical Packages 21
  • 1.5 - The Wretched Grids 26
  • 1.6 - Discussion 30
  • Further Reading 37
  • Part 2 - Evaluation Study 41
  • 2.1 - Background to the Study, Obtaining Permission and Reviewing the Literature 43
  • 2.2 - The Preparation 46
  • 2.3 - Operationalization of the Concepts 50
  • 2.4 - The Questionnaire 55
  • 2.5 - The Findings 62
  • 2.6 - Discussion 68
  • Further Reading 73
  • Part 3 - The Experimental Study 79
  • 3.1 - Background to the Study 81
  • 3.2 - The Literature Review 84
  • 3.3 - Obtaining Permission and Ethical Dilemmas in Experimental Research 88
  • 3.4 - Aims and Purpose of the Study 91
  • 3.5 - The Plan for Data Collection and Analysis 96
  • 3.6 - The Result 101
  • 3.7 - Overall Findings 107
  • 3.8 - Limitations of the Study and Recommendations 115
  • 3.9 - Discussion 117
  • Further Reading 121
  • Part 4 - Ethnographic Study 127
  • 4.1 - Statement of the Problem and Purpose of the Study 129
  • 4.2 - Setting the Scene and the Analysis of Documentary Evidence 133
  • 4.3 - The Review of the Literature 137
  • 4.4 - The Research Contract and the Principle of Informed Consent 144
  • 4.5 - The Fieldwork 147
  • 4.6 - Analysing the Data 157
  • 4.7 - A Solution to the Problem? 163
  • 4.8 - Dcussi0n 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • Part 5 - The Survey 179
  • 5.1 - Background to the Study 181
  • 5.2 - The Preparation and Planning 189
  • 5.3 - The Staff Questionnaire 194
  • 5.4 - Discussion of the Findings 206
  • 5.5 - Discussion 217
  • Further Reading 222
  • Postscript 227
  • Learning from Research 229
  • Glossary 233
  • References 250
  • Index 255
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