Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

By Judith Bell; Clive Opie | Go to book overview

3.8
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Cher Ping cautions that care should be taken in interpreting the results of his research. First, he points out that the sample size is very small and that might have affected both the reliability and validity of the research. However, as we have seen, in order to ensure more reliable results, the analysis was submitted to a t-test with a small p value. The level of significance was kept low at 1 per cent which gave 99 per cent probability that the results had not arisen by chance.

Second, he points out that there was always the possibility that improvement in academic results might have been due to the novelty effect which might soon wear off.

Third, only students from four Science classes in the college participated in the study and it would be difficult to generalize or even relate the research results to Arts and Commerce students who might experience a higher level of computer anxiety.

Fourth, the research only suggested that CBL in support classes had a positive impact on students' cognitive and attitudinal gains. It overlooked the teacher's attitudes towards the use of CBL as a teaching tool. The fact that certain pedagogical features appeal to students is no guarantee that a particular technique will be attractive to teachers because of the demands made on teaching time. Additional research would be needed before educators and

-115-

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Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures and Tables xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - The Descriptive Study 5
  • 1.1 - Background to the Study and Critics of Descriptive Studies 7
  • 1.2 - The Preparation 11
  • 1.3 - Moving on to Data Collection 15
  • 1.4 - Using Computer Statistical Packages 21
  • 1.5 - The Wretched Grids 26
  • 1.6 - Discussion 30
  • Further Reading 37
  • Part 2 - Evaluation Study 41
  • 2.1 - Background to the Study, Obtaining Permission and Reviewing the Literature 43
  • 2.2 - The Preparation 46
  • 2.3 - Operationalization of the Concepts 50
  • 2.4 - The Questionnaire 55
  • 2.5 - The Findings 62
  • 2.6 - Discussion 68
  • Further Reading 73
  • Part 3 - The Experimental Study 79
  • 3.1 - Background to the Study 81
  • 3.2 - The Literature Review 84
  • 3.3 - Obtaining Permission and Ethical Dilemmas in Experimental Research 88
  • 3.4 - Aims and Purpose of the Study 91
  • 3.5 - The Plan for Data Collection and Analysis 96
  • 3.6 - The Result 101
  • 3.7 - Overall Findings 107
  • 3.8 - Limitations of the Study and Recommendations 115
  • 3.9 - Discussion 117
  • Further Reading 121
  • Part 4 - Ethnographic Study 127
  • 4.1 - Statement of the Problem and Purpose of the Study 129
  • 4.2 - Setting the Scene and the Analysis of Documentary Evidence 133
  • 4.3 - The Review of the Literature 137
  • 4.4 - The Research Contract and the Principle of Informed Consent 144
  • 4.5 - The Fieldwork 147
  • 4.6 - Analysing the Data 157
  • 4.7 - A Solution to the Problem? 163
  • 4.8 - Dcussi0n 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • Part 5 - The Survey 179
  • 5.1 - Background to the Study 181
  • 5.2 - The Preparation and Planning 189
  • 5.3 - The Staff Questionnaire 194
  • 5.4 - Discussion of the Findings 206
  • 5.5 - Discussion 217
  • Further Reading 222
  • Postscript 227
  • Learning from Research 229
  • Glossary 233
  • References 250
  • Index 255
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