The Psychology of Men's Health

By Christina Lee; R. Glynn Owens | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Men and family

Chapter 7 argued that hegemonic masculinity defines men according to their formal paid jobs, and that this is problematic not only because changes in employment patterns make this prescribed role harder to maintain, but also because this rigid definition reduces men's capacity to choose to be actively involved in family life. Many men who would prefer a more active role in their families have little idea of how to achieve this, and whatever their spoken preferences, families find it difficult to avoid the traditional division of labour, despite evidence that this reduces the quality of men's relationships with partners and children (for example Hawkins et al. 1993).

This chapter reviews evidence on the roles of men in families, focusing on men as fathers and on the effects on men of relationship breakdown. Changes in social structures mean that men's family experiences are increasingly central to their identities. This chapter, like the last, points to the asymmetries between expectations for men and for women. It also points to the contradictions between traditional patriarchal expectations for men and contemporary egalitarian expectations for couples. In the family as in the workforce, men are caught in a structural dilemma in which any choice will be less than ideal. Once again, however, stereotypes of appropriate gender-based behaviours and interests appear to have influenced mainstream research agendas. Thus, mothering and motherhood have been subjected to intense scrutiny while with few exceptions (for example Thomas 1994) the parenting experiences of men have been largely ignored.

Contemporary psychological theorists generally reject models (for example Deutsch 1947; Bowlby 1951) that explicitly adopt, and treat as selfevidently true, the unsubstantiated social myths which underlie essentialist models of gender difference: myths such as men's inability to provide childcare and women's psychological need for parenthood. But the psychological literature continues to be based on an implicit assumption that men's relationships with their families are peripheral and largely unnecessary, and

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Men's Health
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editors' Foreword vi
  • Preface viii
  • Chapter 1 - Gender and Men's Health 1
  • Chapter 2 - Health Behaviours and Health Service Use 11
  • Chapter 3 - Emotional Expression 19
  • Chapter 4 - Risk-Taking, Violence and Criminality 30
  • Chapter 5 - Sexuality and Men's Health 42
  • Chapter 6 - Men and Their Bodies 55
  • Chapter 7 - Men and Work 70
  • Chapter 8 - Men and Family 87
  • Chapter 9 - Men and Ageing 101
  • Chapter 10 - The Psychology of Men's Health: a Gendered 113
  • References 120
  • Index 148
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.