Disability, Human Rights and Education: Cross Cultural Perspectives

By Felicity Armstrong; Len Barton | Go to book overview

Introduction

Len Barton and Felicity Armstrong

The production of this book has been a difficult, disturbing and exciting task. It has involved struggles over how to describe, understand and make tentative connections between different political and economic systems, historical influences, cultural values, conceptual meanings, policies and practices. The realities of such dilemmas are, for example, expressed in the different theoretical and writing styles that the contributors have used in order to analyse the societies they are discussing.

In each society struggles are taking place within and between different interest groups contesting the rights to speak, to challenge particular perspectives and to offer alternative ideas and interpretations concerning these complex and fundamental issues of disability, human rights and education. In this context, the extent to which the voices of disabled people are part of this conflictual engagement for representation and change is of crucial importance.

All the contributors, including ourselves, are unsure, confused and exercised over a series of personal dilemmas in relation to several aspects of the agendas and questions raised in this book. None of us is complacent and we recognize the immensity of the work which still needs to be done. This includes the importance of a critical engagement with the material presented in this book.

One of the immense difficulties which each author has had to engage with is that of attempting to make connections between the wider structuring influences of economic conditions and political systems, globalization and the illuminating detail of micro, situational aspects of social experience. We greatly sympathize with Whitty etal. (1998) and their perceptive analysis of some of the key factors involved. They maintain:

Seeking to integrate the one with the other inevitably means that the
theoretical clarity will sometimes be politically obscured by empirical
messiness, while what appear to be significant details in particular

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Disability, Human Rights and Education: Cross Cultural Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.