Disability, Human Rights and Education: Cross Cultural Perspectives

By Felicity Armstrong; Len Barton | Go to book overview

4

Human rights and inclusive
education in China: a Western
perspective

Patricia Potts


Overview

In this chapter I shall discuss the meaning and value of human rights and inclusive education from both Western and Chinese perspectives. Although I shall also refer to international contexts for Western and Chinese perspectives, I shall not look in detail at how far rhetoric and diplomacy filter and refract domestic debates for overseas consumption. There are many relevant issues for whose discussion there is no space here: China's relationship with Tibet, the influence of multinational corporations, the globalization of information technology, the length of time it has taken for the UK to pass the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995 or China's rationale of 'One country, two systems' in relation to Hong Kong. I am also aware of the difficulty of portraying the complexities and internal variations of contrasting perspectives, whatever the permitted word length.

I shall argue that concepts of rights and inclusion in education have different meanings in different cultural and political settings but that, despite the significance of recent educational reforms, the stereotypic individualism of the West and collectivism of China both present obstacles to the development of education systems in which all students are valued equally and responded to equitably.


Human rights: a Western perspective

I began with the assumption that human rights are universal. For example, everyone shares an equal right to food and shelter. However, as soon as I extended my list to health, education and justice, my idea of an indisputable 'human right' dissolved, as I realized that there could be an infinity of interpretations. Moreover, not only are health, education and justice inaccessible

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Disability, Human Rights and Education: Cross Cultural Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.